PAINTING

Lidless Eye: Idiosyncratic Illustrations

New vendor alert! Stephen Ferris of Lidless Eye Illustration is a long-time shopper at the Royal Bison, but a first-time vendor, and we’re so excited to welcome him to the other side! Stephen describes his work as “a body of small-scale works that I have been creating over the last 4 months. The pieces in this series are a little bit random; I normally work on larger-scale paintings that require a lot of research and planning, but being able to work on smaller pieces allows me to quickly explore my own strange idiosyncrasies in a non-objective, black-and-white fashion.” Catch him at the Bison from December 7-9, Follow Stephen on Instagram (@stephendferris) and read on to find out what inspires him!

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Royal Bison: What draws you to making or designing things?
Lidless Eye:
I got into art and design later in life and I feel like I’m making up for lost time. I find it to be a very meditative as a decompressing experience. Listening to endless amounts of music while working on something new definitely inspires me and I try to melt it into my work.

RB: What’s new for your line or business this season?
LE:
I’m going small scale for Royal Bison and will be showcasing all my new creations for the event. There will be hundreds of ink on raw-birch, original illustrations, etchings, prints, and a few trinkets.

RB: What do you think sets your work apart from similar makers or designers?
LE:
I’m self-taught; I didn’t go to art school and I learn at my own pace.  My style is a natural progression of exploration and refinement. My work is highly chaotic and calculated all at the same time.

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RB: How do you feel about being a part of the Edmonton creative community?
LE:
Getting involved with Harcourt House this year was definitely a highlight for me. I’ve exhibited in their incubator gallery, and I’ve volunteered there as well. It’s a great community that is artist-run. Outside of that, I’ve spent a lot of time getting to know different online art communities. I got used to the online route when I was living in Northern B.C. and struggled with dealing with the solitude and limitations of showing artwork there when I first started out. It really has allowed me to reach outside on a broader, global scale. I fail miserably at going out very often to experience the art and music scenes in Edmonton. I usually go to the galleries in Edmonton every couple of years and check out the odd music or arts festival.

RB: Please gush about a few of your designer, maker, or creative crushes!
LE:
Anatoly TimoFeevich Fomenko, Clint Fulkerson, Jack Shadbolt, Jean Giraud (Mobius), and   K.Vansteenbergen.

RB: Do you have a favourite holiday tradition you can share with us?
LE:
I have a few, I try to make a massive painting over the holidays and catch up with the luxury of cable television at my parents. Other then that, we order pizza and watch Seinfeld in the living room (no airing of grievances, unfortunately, I think we turned out all right).

Visit Stephen Ferris’ website to see more of his work and what he’ll be bringing to the Royal Bison: www.stephendferrisartwork.webs.com

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Jovi Klak: Vibrant Wood Art

New vendor alert! We have your new favourite kind of cookie at the Royal Bison this season: wood cookies! Edmonton based artist, Jovi Klak, digitally or hand paints expressive mandalas on wood cookies with vibrant and unusual palettes! Catch her at the Bison from November 30 to December 2, Follow Jovi on Instagram (@jovi.klak) to view more of her work, and read on to see where her inspiration comes from!

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Royal Bison: What draws you to making or designing things?
Jovi Klak:
I am compelled to create because it allows me to stay present. If I encounter something that moves me, there is an urge to capture its colours and patterns. I’m also hungry to improve and know I’ll feel terrible if I stop.

RB: What’s new for your line or business this season?
JK:
I’ll be using a different type of wood for my cookie paintings. I spent one day this spring chain-sawing and sanding a fallen Poplar on my parents’ farm. Getting materials from a familiar area makes me appreciate the pieces more. With the upcoming holiday season, I’ll also be printing greeting cards and making ornaments.

RB: What do you think sets your work apart from similar makers or designers?
JK:
I often gather colours from my surroundings, but am drawn to vibrant, moody, and unusual palettes. I enjoy combining expressive lines with orderly details and consider the wood’s original pattern when painting cookies. I ultimately believe everyone’s work is different (even if using a similar approach).

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RB: How do you feel about being a part of the Edmonton creative community?
JK:
I can be quite introverted, but I make time each week to have a drawing night with a friend. It’s great bouncing ideas and not working in a bubble. I’m looking forward to meeting more creatives at Bison!

RB: Please gush about a few of your designer, maker, or creative crushes!
JK:
I’m inspired by so many people and things. The rhythms and compositions of Gustav Klimt’s work. Thick brush strokes from impressionist paintings. Henna artists painting limbs in the streets. Marimekko patterns. Patterns on thrift store clothing. Patterns found in nature… So. Many. Patterns. I do have a creative crush on Joan Sherman though. She is an Athabasca-based artist who paints, sketches, and writes about the natural world she loves. A portion of her art sales go towards supporting wildlife habitat conservation, and for over a decade she has sponsored 50+ high school students to attend a week long Visual Arts program. I was one of those students, and it felt really great knowing that there was a creative advocate in my hometown. I also met Joan years later at a craft fair, where she gave me a sketchbook and championed me to fill it. This woman oozes encouragement and good vibes—who wouldn’t have a crush on that?

RB: Do you have a favourite holiday tradition you can share with us?
JK:
Making prune buns! My father’s side is Polish and prune buns have been a staple family dessert for many years. They’re pretty much a fried donut with prune filling—ahhh bliss. And yes, I know they’re prunes—but don’t knock it till you’ve tried it ;)

Visit Jovi Klak’s website to view more of the work that she plans on bringing to the Royal Bison: www.joviklak.com

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Bond Over A Moment With Erin Elizabeth Ross

Erin Elizabeth Ross lives and works in Edmonton- her work has been represented in commercial galleries since 2008, and sits in multiple private and public collections. Along with her commercial representation, Erin has had work in shows at the Art Gallery of Alberta, Latitude 53 contemporary Art Gallery, Harcourt house, the Art Gallery of St. Albert, and recently a public art piece for the city of Edmonton. It's Erins first time vending at a Bison and we cannot wait to have her with us! You can keep up with the latest Erin is coming up with on instagram (@erinelizabethrosspainting) and read on down below to see what makes Erin tick:

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RB: What draws you to making/designing things?
ERIN: I’ve always (and I mean always) been drawn to making things.  Drawing, paintings, little sculptures and dioramas.  For me it’s definitely something intrinsic I chose to feed- so I guess the easy answer is I can’t imagine a life I’m happy in if I’m NOT making things. 

RB: What’s new for your line/business this spring?
ERIN: This will be my first time ever creating and selling limited edition prints of my work, exclusively for the Royal Bison.  There will be 3 different images to choose from.

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RB: What’s in your designer/maker/creative plans for 2018?
ERIN: I’m still very excited about my fire work (there will be a few for sale at The Bison!) and I’d like to dig further into that.  For me these paintings are about presenting moments of tragedy we bond over, cry over, feel alive over, create stories we pass from generation to generation over.  They depict in a modern way the land I come from, that my ancestors settled and died on, and that I’ll return to one day.

Also I’m on the hunt for something collaborative! I don’t know what it will yet- but I’m excited to work on a project with other creatives.

RB: Tell us about a few of your designer/maker/creative crushes:
ERIN: Oh man- well, I have a lot, a lifetime worth really… but I was living in Cape Town, South Africa last year, and had the absolute pleasure of meeting some creatives over there that were so interesting and honest. The exquisite painter (and baker actually) Alice Toich @alice_toich, the incredibly kind and curious pop artist Keith Vlahakis @keithvlahakis, and the inspired mural artist Ben Johnston @benjohnstondesign (who consequently was born and raised in Cape Town but currently calls Toronto home). 

You can find Erins astonishing portfolio online at www.erinelizabethross.com

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