JEWELRY

Fast & Dirty Collective: Collaborative Art

New vendor alert! We’re excited to welcome Jennifer Rae Forsyth and Kristen Hutchinson of the Fast & Dirty Collective! They’re an Edmonton based rotating collective of artists and curators that creates artworks, exhibitions, and art events for short durations. They focus on collaborative making, unusual environments, and challenging curatorial methods. Catch them at the Bison from December 7-9, follow them on Instagram (@fastanddirtycollective) and Twitter (@fastanddirty), and read on to discover what inspires them!

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Royal Bison: What draws you to making or designing things?
Fast & Dirty Collective:
In our recent work, we are especially interested in exploring the processes of collaborative making. Collaboration is often viewed as an idyllic state where people harmoniously achieve a common goal, but collaboration can also be a battle, a struggle between control freaks, a process of slowly coming to terms with one another’s interventions and ideas, and a space for experimentation. Collaborations are common place in the contemporary art world, with artists and scholars coming together from across disciplines to share similar interests and/or support shared causes. But what if there was no specific goal or aim? What if the purpose of collaboration was to explore the act of collaboration and the co-mingling of individual creative processes and struggles? This is how we approach collaboration.

RB: What’s new for your line or business this season?
FDC:
In the last two years Forsyth and Hutchinson have been collaborating on art and craft projects. The work we are selling is inspired by our most recent body of artwork titled Get Out of My Way. These items include collaborative artworks on wood panels and reversible, mixed media wooden jewelry pendants.  

RB: What do you think sets your work apart from similar makers or designers?   
FDC:
The collaborative aspect of work and that all our jewelry and artworks are unique and one of a kind. The items we will be selling are handmade, collaborative artworks by two practicing artists, where one artist responds to the other's work on opposite sides of the pendants or beside each other on the panels. We have also created panels where we both collaborated to create a single collage image.

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RB: How do you feel about being a part of the Edmonton creative community?
FDC:
We love the DIY and collaborative aspects of Edmonton’s creative community. The fast & dirty collective was established by artists for artists and we have promoted Edmonton artists at all stages of career development through events that offer an alternative to traditional gallery formats.

RB: Please gush about a few of your designer, maker, or creative crushes!
FDC:
Rebecca Bellmore, Christine Borland, Janine Antoni, Janet Cardiff, Adrian Piper & Shawna Dempsey & Lori Millan

RB: Do you have a favourite holiday tradition you can share with us?
FDC:
Kristen hosts an annual Chrismukkah party where she serves homemade latkes, kugel, sugar cookies, and anatomically correct gingerpeople of all genders.

Follow Fast & Dirty Collective on Instagram to see more of the work they’ll be brining to the Royal Bison: @fastanddirtycollective

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Kelly Ruth: Gorgeous Woven Jewelry

New vendor alert! Working with plant dyes, Kelly Ruth uses a weaving loom to build tiny woven jewelry out of hand-dyed yarns. Having worked as the textile dyer for over a decade at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet and ballet companies across Canada, she brings years of experience to her craft to create truly memorable pieces. Catch her at the Bison from December 7-9, follow her on Instagram (@kelly__ruth) to view more of her work and read on to discover what inspires her!

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Royal Bison: What draws you to making or designing things?
Kelly Ruth:
I am a multidisciplinary artist working in textiles and new media, primarily in weaving and sound. My artwork spans a practice in performance, installation, and design, incorporating micro-controllers, sensors, and electronics into my woven installations. I never stop creating and innovating. The jewelry line is a way to make something accessible that can be loved and owned by people. This is very different than the more temporal forms of art that I make in my practice. It is a way to connect differently to the communities that I engage with.

RB: What’s new for your line or business this season?
KR:
The jewelry is a new line for me within the past couple of years. Previously the energy I spent on designing was dedicated to a natural dyed sustainable fibre clothing line. Since I really just want to weave these days, I love having switched to making the woven jewelry line.

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RB: What do you think sets your work apart from similar makers or designers?
KR:
Working with the natural dyes creates a really gorgeous palette and as far as statement jewelry goes, not many folks are making woven jewelry!

RB: How do you feel about being a part of the Edmonton creative community?
KR:
Having moved to Edmonton just over a year ago I felt really welcomed in. The experimental  music community where I spend much of my time (using my loom as a musical instrument) has been wonderful and is really pushing me in new directions in my sound art.

RB: Please gush about a few of your designer, maker, or creative crushes!
KR:
I really love any artist who uses craft in fine art in a conceptual way. When an artist can make highly skilled pieces using craft mediums while engaging the viewer in a brilliant conversation with contemporary ideas…that’s where my crush begins.

Visit Kelly Ruth’s website to view more of the work that she’ll be bringing to the Royal Bison: www.kellyruth.ca

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JShine Designs: Beautiful Indigenous Beadwork Jewelry

With one successful Bison under her belt, Jessica Sanderson-Barry of JShine Designs is back! An Indigenous-owned company, JShine Designs focuses on beaded handmade jewelry and accessories. Jessica combines both traditional and contemporary beading styles into each piece by using elements from the land. Catch her at the Bison from December 7-9, follow her on Instagram (@JShineDesigns) to view more of her work and read on to discover what inspires her!

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Royal Bison: What draws you to making or designing things?
JShine Designs:
 a nêhiyaw-iskwêw ~ Cree woman, my culture was always important to me and to have the opportunity to share my culture through my art is something that I have always had a passion for. Beading is my medicine, when I bead it feels as though it’s a connection to my late grandmothers.

RB: What’s new for your line or business this season?  
JSD:
I have a passion for designing statement pieces using elements from the land, such as hides, dentalium shells, and porcupine quills. I am now incorporating antique and vintage beads in my work, some are over 100 years old! Those who wear some of my art will be wearing a piece of history.  

RB: What do you think sets your work apart from similar makers or designers?  
JSD:
I wanted my work to be unique and apart from what other designers were creating. I love using antique and vintage beads in my work because each bead has a story. Beadwork is storytelling and to be able to transcend these stories into my work by using many different elements makes each piece unique.  

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RB: How do you feel about being a part of the Edmonton creative community?
JSD:
My first Royal Bison market, I immediately felt I was apart of this amazing community by meeting some many great supporters who believe in handmade local art. Kudos to those who support local businesses you’re theee best!!!

RB: Please gush about a few of your designer, maker, or creative crushes!  
JSD:
I admire strong Indigenous artists like my late great-grandmother Jenny Lightning who was a phenomenal beader and designer. I also love the work from Smithstine Copper because she creates her jewellery from nothing and it’s transformed into a unique piece of wearable art.

RB: Do you have a favourite holiday tradition you can share with us?  
JSD:
We like to give back to the community by donating time serving a holiday dinner to people in need. This is what fills my heart.  

Visit JShine Designs website to see more of the work they’ll be bringing to the Royal Bison: www.JShineDesigns.ca

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Smithstine Copper: Unique Prairie Jewelry

Smithstine Copper is a one-woman studio creating prairie inspired and custom copper jewelry and accessories. Kristine MacDonald, of Smithstine Copper, has been making jewelry since 2011, first joining us for the holiday season in 2013. "Copper has become my metal of choice because it is soft, shines up beautifully and is not particularly common in jewelry making. My copper designs are mainly prairie related because I appreciate Alberta's diverse features, creatures and landmarks." Catch her at the Bison both weekends, Follow her on Instagram or Twitter to keep up with her new work and read on to learn what inspires her!

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Royal Bison: What draws you to making or designing things?
Smithstine Copper:
I love working with my hands and creating tangible, wearable art inspired by the things I encounter on adventures.

RB: What’s new for your line or business this season?
SC:
Copper enameling! I’ve recently begun learning the craft of copper enameling, which is the process of sifting a fine glass powder onto copper and heating it up in a very hot kiln. The glass powder melts and fuses to the copper. It creates beautiful, glossy, vibrant colours on the surface of the copper. This was a hobby of my grandma and mom in the ‘70s and I am excited to be able to use some of their tools and kiln. I will have lots of new colourful pieces with me on both weekends of the Bison.

RB: What do you think sets your work apart from similar makers or designers?
SC:
Copper is not a particularly common metal in the world of jewelry making. When I began working exclusively in copper I didn’t know of anyone else working with it and ended up self-teaching myself most of the techniques I now use through trial and error. I love it’s malleability, rosy colour and the way it shines up. Copper has many unique properties that make it a dream to wear and to work with.

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RB: How do you feel about being a part of the Edmonton creative community?
SC:
I love being a creative in Edmonton because there is a lot of support within the community and between artists. Others are always willing to share tips, collaborate, and lend a hand. The patrons who attend art and craft fairs are so encouraging and enthusiastic, which I love! I think that Edmonton is often overlooked as a creative hub and maybe that’s why art & design flourish here under the radar.

RB: Please gush about a few of your designer, maker, or creative crushes!
SC:
Aurélie Guillaume of Montréal is a creative genius and combines wacky character illustrations and vibrant enamel to make incredibly ornate and unique jewelry. I am in awe of the fine detail she includes in these pieces.

RB: Do you have a favourite holiday tradition you can share with us?
SC:
We don’t have a lot of traditions anymore, but I always love having friends and family over, decorating sugar cookies, snowy days, and drinking mulled wine.

Check out Smithstine Copper’s Instagram to discover more about what pieces she’ll be bringing to the Royal Bison!

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White Otter Design Co: Traditional Indigenous Artistry & Contemporary Fashion

Jaymie Campbell of White Otter Design Co. incorporates traditional Indigenous artistry and contemporary fashion to craft gorgeous crafts gorgeous jewellery, wallets, and other pieces. On her art, Jaymie says, “I strive to use authentic materials in all of my work, and you will often see the use of hand-tanned hides, horse hair, and porcupine quills. Much of the material is sourced from local communities and elders, though I put a strong focus on learning the traditional skills in order to use them in her work and pass them down to future generations.” Catch her at the Bison from December 7-9, follow her on Instagram (@WhiteOtterDesignCo) to see more of her work and read on to discover what inspires her!

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Royal Bison: What draws you to making or designing things?
White Otter Design:
Creating for me is an important connection to my culture, ancestors, and identity. I love being part of the wonderful artist community and it is important for me to learn traditional skills in order to pass them down to future generations.

RB: What’s new for your line or business this season?
WOD:
This is the first year I have participated in some large Indigenous fashion events and my line has become a lot more diverse. I have started turning some of my large beadwork patterns into jewellery and incorporating some new materials such as horse hair and different furs.

RB: What do you think sets your work apart from similar makers or designers?
WOD:
Most Indigenous artists have unique styles that are influenced by our cultural backgrounds, communities and teachers, and mine is no different. I have unique patterns and colours and use a lot of traditional materials that I make or harvest.

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RB: How do you feel about being a part of the Edmonton creative community, or whichever community you call home?
WOD:
I don’t live in Edmonton, but have been very much embraced by the community. I love being able to reach out to other artists and share advice, learnings, and experiences with each other. Artists and designers are cut from a different cloth and I just love spending time with “my people.”

RB: Please gush about a few of your designer, maker, or creative crushes!
WOD:
Oh man. There are so many! Jadial GreyEagle does incredible beadwork and is a massive activist for Indigenous women. She produced her first documentary alongside Tantoo Cardinal this year! SectionThirtyFive is a clothing line designed out of Vancouver but the owner is from Samson Cree Nation outside of Edmonton. He is totally crushing it and moving onto an international stage with Indigenous Fashion. Catherine Blackburn is this artist from Saskatchewan and she is so crazy talented in so many mediums it is mind blowing!

RB: Do you have a favourite holiday tradition you can share with us?
WOD:
Watching Bing Crosby’s White Christmas with my family.

Learn more about White Otter Design Co. and what she’ll be bringing to the Royal Bison on her Instagram!

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Les Arts Plastiques: Funky Mid-Century Modern Art Inspired Jewelry

Alicia Pawlowski, aka Les Arts Plastiques, has been welcomed repeat vendor with Bison since 2012 and for good reason: HER WORK IS FABULOUS! We're always happy to hear stories from her London adventures! Alicia had this to say about her work: "I make one of a kind, limited run jewelry in sterling silver and brass with a lot of gemstones. My designs are heavily inspired by art deco and mid-century motifs." We love art with a story around Bison headquarters: Do yourself a favour and ask Alicia about her pieces in person, you will not regret it. 

Keep up with Alicia's progress on instagram (@lesartsplastiques) and read on down below to see what inspires her to create!

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RB: What draws you to making/designing things? 
ALICIA: Instinct? I always have to be making something—it’s an itch I need to scratch. I was always the kid who had to craft. In elementary school I’d peddle my Britney Spears inspired fringed beaded necklaces on the bus. 

RB: What’s new for your line/business this spring?
ALICIA: New stone setting techniques! Signet rings! A collection inspired by prairie botanicals meets ancient roman hoard.

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RB: What’s in your designer/maker/creative plans for 2018 (new materials? New ideas? New places?):
ALICIA: Living part time in London has been hugely inspiring. The Victoria & Albert museum has one of the biggest and broadest collections of jewellery in the world, I head on down on the regular and sketch away to my hearts’ content surrounded by literally, all the jewellery. Expect more funky midcentury modern art inspired jewels down the pipe for me. 

RB: Tell us about a few of your designer/maker/creative crushes:
ALICIA: The late Naum Slutzky (not just for sharing my nickname—plz don’t include that bad joke). He was probably the only jeweller tied to the Bauhaus movement. Alexander Calder, the dude who gave us those amazing mobiles among his sculptures, also made really great jewellery.  The theme for these 2 is that they’re both long dead.

Of Bisoneers past and present, Jeanie Andronyk is hugely inspiring, as is my pal Emily Chu.

www.lesartsplastiques.ca <<< head on over to Alicia's shop to check out what she has for sale!

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JShine Designs Shares Cree Culture Through Wearable Art

Jessica Sanderson-Barry, of JShine Designs, is bringing her handmade jewelry work to Bison for the first time! You got it folks: NEW VENDOR ALERT!!! *POOSH* (confetti canon goes off). Jessica has this to say about her work "JShine Designs is an Indigenous owned business by Jessica Sanderosn-Barry who is from Treaty 6 Territory James Smith Cree Nation. She hand makes earrings and necklaces using elements from the land such as hides, shells and porcupine quills." You can keep up with Jessica's progress on instagram (@jshinedesigns) and read on down below to find out more about Jessica's process!

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RB: What draws you to making/designing things?
JESSICA: As a nehiyaw iskwew ~ Cree woman, my culture was always important to me and to have the opportunity to share my culture through my art is something that I have always had a passion for.  Beading is my medicine, when I bead it feels as though it’s a connection to my late grandmothers.

RB: What’s new for your line/business this spring?
JESSICA: I have a passion of designing statement pieces using elements from the land, such as hides, dentalium shells and porcupine quills.  This includes feathers earrings made out of deer hide, buffalo hide and one & two-feathered necklaces, hand beaded earrings and traditionally tanned elk small earrings.  

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RB: What’s in your designer/maker/creative plans for 2018 (new materials? New ideas? New places?):
JESSICA: This year I will be using traditional brain tanned elk hide and using this hide incorporating my hide into different styles of earrings.  If you have not smelled traditionally tanned elk hide, let me tell you it smells amazing and brings me back to the land.  

RB: Tell us about a few of your designer/maker/creative crushes:
JESSICA: I admired strong Indigenious artist like my late-Great grandmother Jenny Lightning who was a phenominal beader, designer and she traditional tanned her own hides incorporating these hides into her art.

Head on over to to Jessica's instagram (@jshinedesigns) to see her work! 

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Exploring Geometric Patterns With Anne Tranholm

Anne Tranholm is a Danish multi-disciplinary artist and stunning designer. She is based out of Calgary AB, and is bringing her mesmerising jewelry to our Spring market! Having first joined us in 2016, we couldn't be happier to have her back. Anne had this to say of her work "I create jewelry pieces inspired by geometric shapes and nature. Each piece is drawn by hand - from the initial designing each shape with pencil and paper to tracing and colouring the final piece with coloured pencil and india ink." You can really see the love and care that go into each piece! WE LOVE EM. You can keep up with Anne's progress on both instagram//twitter (@annetranholm) and you can find out more about what inspires Anne to create by reading on down below!

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RB: What draws you to making/designing things? 
ANNE: I believe I have a healthy(?) obsession with creating shapes and finding interesting colour combinations. I will be very observant and see certain shapes and colours in cityscapes and nature. I think it’s a way of taking in my everyday surroundings and abstracting them. O also like the idea of making interesting and different jewelry that will spice up wardrobes (I myself almost wear exclusively black clothes) so making colourful jewelry is a way to add some colour.

RB: What’s new for your line/business this spring?
ANNE: I have new earring and necklace designs introduced, matched with some new colour combinations.

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RB: What’s in your designer/maker/creative plans for 2018?
ANNE: I hope to develop more shapes, travel more for inspiration and hopefully expand my jewelry line to more shops in Canadaa and across the world. 

RB: Tell us about a few of your designer/maker/creative crushes:
ANNE: I am a huge fan of Smithstine Coppers jewelry. I love how she works that copper and owns her skills so amazingly. I also really love Sam Knopp Ceramics and how she uses texture and color to her awesome ceramic work.

www.annetranholm.com << head on over to Anne's portfolio site to see all of her amazing work. And make sure to check out her paintings! They're wonderful!

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Bold. Beautiful. Beton Brut Design.

Amanda Nogier, of Béton Brut Design, is bringing us her gorgeous concrete work again! We can't wait to see her new pieces. Béton Brut Design is a concrete jewelry and home décor company utilizing handmade and industrial processes. Amanda is one of the most pleasant people on Earth to talk to as well, do yourself a favour and introduce yourself if her booth isn't being swamped with purchases! You can keep up with Béton Brut Designs progress on instagram or twitter (@betonbrutdesign) and keep on reading to see what has been inspiring Amanda to create lately and what she has in store for 2018!

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RB: What draws you to making/designing things?
BBD: There is nothing that makes me happier than being able to spend my day designing and working with my hands creating beautiful objects from ordinary materials.

RB: What’s new for your line/business this spring?
Now that I have perfected my process I have been hard at work in the studio designing an entire line of new jewelry that utilizes my industrial design background and 3D modelling expertise.

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RB: What’s in your designer/maker/creative plans for 2018?
BBD: My 2018 is essentially me just focusing on designing new pieces and experimenting with some new processes that I have already been playing around with over the last couple months. I’m never going to stop pushing myself and my work to new levels and 2018 will be another year of experimenting and testing to make unique pieces unlike anything seen before.

RB: Tell us about a few of your designer/maker/creative crushes:
BBD: Honestly I tend to crush on the people closest to me because there are so many rad people doing amazing things that are right beside me in the markets and shows that I attend. I am lucky to be surrounded by friends who do awesome things!

You can check out the rest of Amanda's amazing portfolio of work by heading on over to www.betonbrutdesign.com.

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Get Lost In The Natural Beauty Of Amanda Parker Design

Amanda Parker Design consists of an expanding collection of jewellery, visual art, lighting, and home accessories that is both modern and refined. Each piece is completely handmade and therefore unique. All of the pieces are created using non-traditional and/or recycled materials employing shapes and textures inspired by nature. Based out of Calgary, AB, Amanda started making full-time after graduating from the Sheridan College Craft & Design Program in 2010, and will be joining us for the first time ever for our November weekend! You can keep up with Amanda's latest works by following her on instagramtwitter and read on down below to see how she responded to our Q&A:

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Q: What are your top 3 influences (artists, things, etc)?
APD: Macrophotography, systems and patterns found in nature, and my interior design background .

Q: Favourite Bison item you’ve picked up at a previous fair?
APD: I found Kitty Kitty Yum Yum on the Bison website and purchased online from her last spring. Her cat toys are adorable!

Amanda Parker Design won “Best in Show - 2D Mixed Media” 2016 at the Art in the Pearl show in Portland Oregon and you can check out her full shop online at www.etsy.com/shop/marianandhazel. Her work is mesmorising and we are thrilled to have her with us!

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An Ode To Alberta In The Exquisitely Crafted Jewelry Of Smithstine Copper

Smithstine is a one-woman studio creating prairie inspired and custom copper jewelry and accessories. Kristine MacDonald, of Smithstine Copper, has been making jewelry since 2011, first joining us for the holiday season in 2013. "Copper has become my metal of choice because it is soft, shines up beautifully and is not particularly common in jewelry making. My copper designs are mainly prairie related because I appreciate Alberta's diverse features, creatures and landmarks." Kristine will be joining us again for the December weekend of the fair and we're real excited to see her again! Follow her on instagram / twitter to keep up with her new work and read on down below to see how she responded to our Q&A:

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Q: What does it mean to be an Edmonton maker/designer/artist?
SC: It’s a privilege to be an artist in a city with so many creative minds and so many supports in place to help us grow.

Q: What are your top 3 influences (artists, things, etc)?
SC: Nature, camping and road trips.

Q: Favourite Bison item you’ve picked up at a previous fair?
SC: I love all of my bison treasures! I especially like a large, woven wall hanging that reminds me of the arctic that I picked up a few years ago.

Swing on over to www.smithstine.com to check out the full shop!

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Where the magic happens.

Where the magic happens.

Let Your Creativity Flow With Jennea Frischke Jewelry

Jennea Frischke has been a creative all her life. She's an incredibly talented jewelry maker and the sweetest person you'll ever meet. She had this to say about her craft, "I’ve been making in different capacities for a long time. I started my first business when was 13 - it was a friendship bracelet company called Forget Me Knots. I went to art school right out of high school, and graduated from the Alberta College of Art and Design from the Jewellery and Metals Department in 2006 and have been making jewels ever since!" We're so excited to have Jennea Frischke Jewelry back with us for the December weekend of our fair! Head on over to her instagram account (@jenneajewelry) and read on down below to find out how she answered our Q&A:

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Q: What does it mean to be an Alberta maker/designer/artist?
JFJ: The creative arts scene in Alberta is very vibrant, and I am lucky to have met many of my closest friends at markets or art events.

Q: What are your top 3 influences (artists, things, etc)?
JFJ: Nature, historical jewelry, and the paranormal.

Q: Favourite Bison item you’ve picked up at a previous fair?
JFJ: A leather evil eye keychain I have had for several years - I use it every day. :)

Head on over to www.jenneafrischke.com to check out Jennea's full shop! You will NOT regret it. We're telling ya... She makes really great stuff!

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Take a Moment with White Otter Design Co

We are absolutely thrilled to have newcomer Jaymie Campbell, of White Otter Design Co, to the December weekend of the fair! An avid outdoorswoman, paddler, traveler, and photographer, Jaymie is an Anishnaabe hailing from Curve Lake First Nation. She is the Associate Director for the Cree nation in Northern Alberta who has been creating art since she was a small child, learning from her mother who was taught by her grandmothers. Read on to find out more about her process below: 

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Q: What does it mean to be an Edmonton maker/designer/artist?
WODC: I have been creating art since I was a small child. Art runs in my family, and I feel the most connected to my ancestry and the most grounded when I am sewing.

My work is inspired by my Anishnaabe heritage, but is also influenced heavily by the time I have spent with the Cree people of the Rocky Mountains and the Dene people in the North. I am inspired by my grandmothers, who were quillwork artists, my mother, my father, who is a painter. I also owe a massive thank you to the Cree elders who have taught and continue to teach me the old ways, which inspire much of the work I do. I am inspired by the way art connects you to the land and to your culture.

Q: What are your top 3 influences (artists, things, etc)?
WODC:

  • The land
  • The elders and my ancestors, especially my grandmothers 
  • The youth

Q: Favourite Bison item you’ve picked up at a previous fair?
MODC: I have not yet been to one, I cannot wait!! 

Jaymie is also a collective artist for Byellowtail Collective in the US and a Storyboot artist for Manitobah Mukluks!

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